#Boardgame Education -Roman history with Enemies of Rome (@worth2004, 2017) and Pandemic: Fall of Rome (@Zmangames_, 2018)

Youngest RMN Boy had some History homework this weekend. Trying to be a good parent, I asked to check it and make sure it was done correctly. I also was curious to see what he is studying.

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thehistorynetwork.org

The subject was the Fall of the Roman Empire. As I flipped through his completed notes packet I quizzed him on some parts:

Me: “Hmm, two capitals?”

Youngest RMN: “Yes, Rome and Constantinople. You know, like in Enemies of Rome.

Me: “Invading Germanic tribes?”

Youngest RMN: “Yes, all the Goths like in Pandemic: Fall of Rome.

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Credit: Self

We both shared a laugh as we realized we describe history in terms of boardgames. That is not a bad thing; the spin-off educational value of boardgames and wargames is heartily approved of my Mrs. RockyMountainNavy. It’s part of the reason we play; the games can educate us in so many ways.


Feature image courtesy Worthington Games.

 

 

 

3 comments

  1. […] I have discussed Enemies of Rome before. I initially started off a bit against the game but over time we keep coming back to it. Every time it gets better. Yes, even after 13 plays it still keeps the RockyMountainNavy Boys and myself engaged. This weekend’s game night showed that Enemies of Rome always has surprises in store. […]

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