Sunday Summary – A Supercharged week of #boardgames, birthday #wargames, and restocking the #book library with @FoundationDietz, @MiniMartTalk, @gmtgames, @compassgamesllc, @USNIBooks

Boardgames

Played multiple solo sessions of the card-driven auto racing game Supercharged: Racing in the Golden Age of Cars (Mike Clifford & Mike Siggins, Dietz Foundation, 2021). Loved my solo plays, and then Circuit de Rocky went all family for a weekend race. Much mayhem ensued! Supercharged will likely make it into the summer lakeside vacation bag as it’s small, rules-light, relatively short to play, and lots of FUN! By the way, please look at The Dietz Foundation and their mission; like them I personally (and professionally) fully support gaming and education. Whether it’s boardgames or RPGs in a classroom or homeschool, or a “professional” wargame for business or government, we all have stories of how games and education mix together for the better.

Supercharged at start

Wargames & Books

Happy Birthday to Me – Thanks to Miniatures Market for remembering my birthday and sending a coupon. I decided to use it before it expires and it was enough to cover tax and shipping for Stalingrad ’42: Southern Russia June – December 1942 (GMT Games, 2019). This will be my second game in Mark Simonitch’s ZoC-Bond series to accompany Holland ’44: Operation Market Garden (GMT Games, 2017) in the wargame library.

This week, Compass Games charged for Indian Ocean Region: South China Seas Vol. II (designer John Gorkowski) so delivery should be getting close. Coincidentally, I’m reading 2034: A Novel of the Next World War by Eliot Ackerman and Admiral James Stavridis which makes for a nice tie-in.

Useful Fiction?

Here is the dust jacket copy of 2034. Looks like the authors are trying to mix Tom Clancy’s Red Storm Rising (1998) with August Cole & P.W. Singer’s Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War (2015):

On March 12, 2034, US Navy Commodore Sarah Hunt is on the bridge of her flagship, the guided missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones, conducting a routine freedom of navigation patrol in the South China Sea when her ship detects an unflagged trawler in clear distress, smoke billowing from its bridge. On that same day, US Marine aviator Major Chris “Wedge” Mitchell is flying an F35E Lightning over the Strait of Hormuz, testing a new stealth technology as he flirts with Iranian airspace. By the end of that day, Wedge will be an Iranian prisoner, and Sarah Hunt’s destroyer will lie at the bottom of the sea, sunk by the Chinese Navy. Iran and China have clearly coordinated their moves, which involve the use of powerful new forms of cyber weaponry that render US ships and planes defenseless. In a single day, America’s faith in its military’s strategic pre-eminence is in tatters. A new, terrifying era is at hand.

So begins a disturbingly plausible work of speculative fiction, co-authored by an award-winning novelist and decorated Marine veteran and the former commander of NATO, a legendary admiral who has spent much of his career strategically out maneuvering America’s most tenacious adversaries. Written with a powerful blend of geopolitical sophistication and literary, human empathy, 2034 takes us inside the minds of a global cast of characters–Americans, Chinese, Iranians, Russians, Indians–as a series of arrogant miscalculations on all sides leads the world into an intensifying international storm. In the end, China and the United States will have paid a staggering cost, one that forever alters the global balance of power.

Everything in 2034 is an imaginative extrapolation from present-day facts on the ground combined with the authors’ years working at the highest and most classified levels of national security. Sometimes it takes a brilliant work of fiction to illuminate the most dire of warnings: 2034 is all too close at hand, and this cautionary tale presents the reader a dark yet possible future that we must do all we can to avoid.

2034: A Novel of the Next World War, dust jacket

Speaking of books, the rest of my U.S. Naval Institute Press “Clear the Decks” sale books arrived. It looks like I will be able to get at least a few History to #Wargame or Rocky Reads for #Wargame postings (along with associated wargame plays) out of this group.

New Naval Institute Press arrivals

Solo #boardgame charging with Supercharged (@FoundationDietz, 2021)

This week I have been racing around Circuit de Rocky with some casual solo games of Supercharged: Racing in the Golden Age of Cars (Mike Clifford & Mike Siggins, Dietz Foundation, 2021). Supercharged is an easy to learn, great to solo if you need to, card-driven auto racing game. Movement mechanics are dead-simple; stay on the Racing Line, Overtake when able, Spin Out if you are Blocked. Pit Stops are a flip of a card. Slipstreaming is very helpful—watch how you stack your cars to make slipstreaming opportunities count! The Action Cards in Supercharged also create some great narratives like in the second race where the first Japanese car retired at the start (broken axle – obviously popped the clutch, right?) and then the second retired after getting stuck after a spin out in the first lap.

Supercharged also has a simple, yet very appealing, table presence. for the second race I sat on the sofa playing the game (solo) on the coffee table in front of me. As the RockyMountainNavy Boys came home we talked about our day (especially the panic buying of gas). While talking, I was casually flipping cards and moving cars. The Boys took a very keen interest in the game which will very likely land on the gaming table this weekend. Personally, I am looking forward to using the Tactics Cards and seeing how these “rule breaker” actions change the game. Later in the evening, Mrs. RMN told me that Miss A, who was at the house during the day, was absolutely fascinated with the game as it sat on my gaming table in the loft. It was laid out as the first race ended and she was intrigued by the cards and artwork. She told Mrs. RMN that it was “obviously” a math game; a reference to the Team Cards which have the various speeds for the teams (like 7+6 for an A-Team or 5+4 for a C-Team).

Order of Finish (Race 1/ Race 2):

  1. France / United Kingdom
  2. Italy / Germany
  3. Italy / Italy
  4. France / Italy
  5. Germany / Siam
  6. Germany / France
  7. United Kingdom / Belgium
  8. Japan / Netherlands (Lapped)
  9. Netherlands / Egypt (Lapped)
  10. Siam / United States (Lapped)
  11. Egypt / United States (Lapped)
  12. USA (Lapped…almost double lapped!) / Egypt (Lapped)

Winnings Thru Two Races:

  • Italy – $140,000 + 100,000 = $240,000
  • France – $140,000 +$20,000 = $160,000
  • Germany – $50,000 + 80,000 = $130,000
  • Egypt – $20,000 + 100,000 = $120,000
  • Netherlands $40,000 + $60,000 = $100,000
  • Siam $90,000
  • Belgium $80,000
  • Japan – $30,000

Winnings in Supercharged make for an interesting campaign game. Of course, the “A-Teams” of Italy, Germany, and France are at the top of the standings and Italy has way more money even though they have not placed first in a race. Look at that Egyptian “C-Team” with three Top 12 finishes in two races—making some good money, eh?

Supercharged (Dietz Foundation, 2021)

Sunday Summary – Too busy to play but NEVER too busy to dream about new #wargame & #boardgame arrivals @FoundationDietz @msiggins @HABA_usa @compassgamesllc @gmtgames @Academy_Games @LeeBWood @Hobiecat18 @SchilMil @Bublublock

Like the title says, didn’t get much gaming in this week as I return to basically full-time in the office. After a year of semi-telework it’s a bit of a shock to the system but, honestly, I love to be back at the grind.

Wargaming

Ended up doing a deep-dive of Fifth Corps: The Soviet Breakthrough at Fulda (Jim Dunnigan, Strategy & Tactics Nr.. 82, Sept/Oct 1980). There is alot of “professional” in this “hobby” title! I also had a real fun trip down memory lane with the accompanying magazine.

Boardgaming

Supercharged (Mike Siggins, Dietz Foundation, 2021) raced to the table. Also gifted (and taught) Dragons Breath: The Hatching (HABA, 2019).

Incoming!

It’s been awhile since I looked at my preorders. I presently am tracking 27 titles in my preorder GeekList. Here are some highlights:

Kickstarter

After complaining a few weeks back about the sheer number of Kickstarter campaigns and their costs I have not been doing a very good job controlling myself since. So far this month I added: