The Simplicity of #1812TheInvasionofCanada (@Academy_Games, 2012)

This weekend the RockyMountainNavy Game Night featured 1812: The Invasion of Canada (Academy Games, 2012). This title is actually the first in the Birth of America-series but was the last to land on the RMN gaming table. 1812 is probably the simplest, least refined game of the series but that same simplicity creates a fast-playing, easy-to-learn gaming experience that delivers a wonderful historical feel that immerses players in the game.

The core mechanics of 1812 are the same as all Birth of America-series games. The usual Reinforcements – Movement – Battle – Draw Cards sequence is there. In 1812, Reinforcements enter at designated Muster Points. This limitation immediately forces players to consider how to flow forces into battles. Movement is done with the usual Movement Cards of which some are movement, some are Events, and of course one is the Treaty Card (combination movement/event). Battles have a subtle asymmetric character about them through the use of special Battle Dice that have different results depending upon the type of unit fighting. In one difference from the usual game series rules, the first “attack” rolls depend upon where the battle takes place with the Home Territory owner getting the first roll. In terms of rules complexity, I consider 1812the least complicated of the series. This makes it very easy to learn and quick-to-play.

Victory in 1812 is through simple majority area control. The game ends at the end of Round 8 or at the end of any round when one side has played all their Treaty Cards.

Unlike other Birth of America titles, 1812 can be played with up to five players (rather than the standard four). The “fifth” faction in this title is the Native Americans. As much as I appreciate the designers stretching the title for five players, in this case I doubt the real enjoyment the Native American player would get in a full game with (very) limited reinforcements and small forces. Native Americans appear in 1775: Rebellion (as a “neutral” faction that can be controlled by either side) and in 1754: The Conquest of America where they are represented again as a “neutral” faction that can be allied with and (using the Native American Expansion) as a source of asymmetric powers and alternate victory conditions.  In 1812, the Native Americans are a sort of “special forces” but are definitely an adjunct force but not a major power.

A major source of enjoyment when playing 1812 is simply looking at the game. The beautiful box art is supported by a map that is evocative of the era and card art that is exceptionally detailed. Just looking at the game immerses the players in the period and helps with the narrative experience.

U%u3KDqDRQKzsGLnzbhsmQOur first game ended in a tie after Round 4 when the Americans had played all their Treaty Cards. Both sides controlled one enemy Homeland Territory. In very typical fashion, the game came down to the last battle roll in the final battle. In this case, the British Regulars were able to defeat a mixed American Regular-Militia army and take the one territory they needed to tie the game. Total playing time for our first game was a very fast 55 minutes. This is partially because all four players (myself and all three RockyMountainNavy Boys) are familiar with the rules.

1812: The Invasion of Canada may be the “simplest” of the Birth of America-series but that does not mean it will end up not getting played. Rather, the many positive attributes of the game (familiar rules, beautiful artwork, thematic play) means it will land on the gaming table often.

Feature image courtesy Academy Games.

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