#Wargame Wednesday – Standard has advantages in Rostov ’41: Race to the Don (@MultiManPub, 2020)

For a few weeks a single wargame, Atlantic Chase: The Kriegsmarine Against the Home Fleet, 1939-1942 (Jeremy White, GMT Games, 2020) occupied both my time and gaming table. Although I ended up enjoying playing the game, the time needed to learn the rules (10 tutorial episodes) was a bit much. When I moved onto the next game in my “to play” list, Rostov ’41: Race to the Don (Ray Weiss, Multi-Man Publishing, 2020) it was a totally different gaming experience, and frankly, more enjoyable.

Rostov ’41 is another edition in the Standard Combat Series of wargames from Multi-Man Publishing (MMP). MMP advertises the SCS as follows:

The Standard Combat Series (SCS) enables both experienced and beginning players to enjoy simple to play and quick to learn games. Each game is a quick-start, complete simulation: rules, a detailed color map, 280 counters, and everything else needed to recreate the campaign in question.

MMP Website

Rostov ’41 and the SCS are exactly the type of game I was hoping to use to “Rev My Gaming Engine.” In this case, the “standard” in SCS is the main draw. Opening up Rostov ’41, I first pulled out the eight-page Series Rules, v 1.8 and gave them a quick skim to remind myself of the fundamentals of the game. I then pulled out the eight-page Rostov ’41 Special Rules and read them a bit more closely. New series rules really only cover three pages with the balance of the Special Rules given over to scenarios and charts. In the case of Rostov ’41, important ‘changes” from the Series Rules are a modified Sequence of Play (1.1) and Barrages (1.6).

Quick Start

Unlike Atlantic Chase, which took me multiple hours (spread over multiple days) to learn before play, Rostov ’41 was on my gaming table literally within an hour of opening the box. It’s at this point that I usually slow down; study the setup, make cautious moves at first as I not only rediscover the game system, but also explore the strategy and tactics needed to reach victory in the particular scenario.

Rostov ’41 box back

The box back of Rostov ’41 is actually a very accurate description of game play. I don’t usually associate “wild gameplay” with a SCS title but with this game it’s quite appropriate. The warning on the back of the box is also easy to ignore…at the player’s own peril:

The German player must use his limited and overstretched forces to pull off a brilliant coup. Playing it safe won’t cut it; speed is all important. With a lot of skill and a bit of luck, Rostov will be yours. Then you’ll have to pay the piper.

The Russian player must conserve his forces as the German rapier expends its energy. While the capture of Rostov requires a lot of skill and some luck on the German part, don’t begin to think your job is easy. Derailing that German drive can easily consume precious forces needed for your main effort: turning the tables on the Germans and taking back great swaths of the Motherland.

Rostov ’41, Box Back

Deep Gaming

I usually play the full scenario for new games but in this case I decided to take a graduated approach to my Rostov ’41 play. Scenario 2.2 “Fritz on the Mius” is the initial German assault and covers turns 1-4 of the campaign game. Scenario 2.3 “Fritz Grabs Rostov” starts mid-game covering turns 7-14 while scenario 2.4 “Soviet Counterpunch” is the Soviet counteroffensive on game turns 11-14. Taking this approach allowed me to explore each segment of the battle separately. Most helpfully, this approach allowed me to learn what both sides need to accomplish in the larger campaign.

Playing Rostov ’41 this way took me a few days but still far fewer than I devoted to Atlantic Chase. By the time I ended my exploration of Rostov ’41 I found myself very satisfied. The main difference in playing Rostov ’41 and Atlantic Chase was that my familiarity and understanding of the SCS system allowed me to “fight the battle” and not “fight the game.” What I mean here is that in Rostov ’41 I was able to study the campaign and the history whereas in Atlantic Chase I am still learning the system making game play more about “manipulating the levers” vice “fighting the battle.” As I am a wargamer that enjoys studying the history of a battle I derive far more enjoyment from the later.

Finding the Right Gear to Maximize Revolutions

Playing Rostov ’41 helps me to reaffirm my “Rev My Game Engine” approach to playing wargames. Looking at my current preorder list, of the 28 games I’m waiting for, seven are truly “unique” to me. All the others are either expansions or derivative designs from ones known to me (with admittedly varied levels of familiarity). Although I look forward to exploring new and different game designs, I also realize that I personally need to take the new in moderation. This is also why I have mad respect for content creators like Grant & Alexander (or is it Alexander & Grant?) from The Players’ Aid or Kev at The Big Board Gaming because they seem to always be taking in the new. How do they enjoy what they’ve got?

Sunday Summary – Chasing rules in Atlantic Chase (@gmtgames, 2020) while waiting to don General’s stars in Rostov ’41 (@MultiManPub, 2020) #wargame #boardgame

Wargame

New arrivals this week include Jeremy White’s Atlantic Chase: The Kriegsmarine Against the Home Fleet, 1939-1942, Intercept Vol. 1 (GMT Games, 2020). This game has generated alot of buzz, for the most part because of the very different approach Jerry took to writing the rule book and tutorial. Some people are out there talking about the second coming of sliced bread. I’m not convinced.

The second new game arrival this week was Ray Weiss’ Rostov ’41: Race to the Don (MultiMan Publishing, 2020). This is a Standard Combat Series game. I have come to expect that a SCS game has a “gimmick” or some special rule to highlight the battle or campaign depicted. However, in my first look through the rules I don’t see any obvious special rules. This might be a case where the scenario and order of battle are the “gimmick.” A deeper look will have to wait until after I get through Atlantic Chase.

With Compass Games announcing that Bruce Maxwell’s NATO: The Cold War Goes Hot – Designer’s Signature Edition is coming in May and after I did a deep dive of Jim Dunnigan’s Fifth Corps (SPI, 1980) (forthcoming from Armchair Dragoons, right Brant?) I took another look at Carl Fung’s Iron Curtain: Central Europe 1945-1989 (MultiMan Publishing, 2020). I looked at it from the perspective of the doctrine of the time(s). That sent me down a rabbit hole excursion into “Correlation of Forces and Means.” Thoughts forthcoming.

Boardgame

I broke down this week and purchased the digital version of Root (Dire Wolf Digital). I’m working my way through the tutorials but so far it’s very entertaining.

Gaming Outlook

Return to work full time is taking away game time so I have to rearrange my schedule. More short evening gaming sessions with maybe a single longer weekend occasion.