#SundaySummary – Brute-al Wargaming by Myself with No Theme Simulated in Fulda (mentions @Modiphius @TheKrulakCenter @BarrickTim @SebastianBae @FoundationDietz @ADragoons @RexBrynen)

Wargames

The Krulak Center BruteCast video/podcast called out Tim Barrick’s Operational Wargame System (OWS) and Sebastian Bae’s Littoral Commander (civilian version available for pre-order from The Dietz Foundation). You get to see lots of how both games work.

Two weeks before Russia began its current invasion of Ukraine, we offered a #BruteCast panel on “Rapid Wargame Prototyping for Crises.” When the invasion actually occurred, #TeamKrulak staff started looking in real time at how to apply rapid prototyping concepts to the wargame platforms already offered to the Marine Corps University and wider national security communities. The goal was to provide “living” wargame layers and mechanics to allow these communities to learn and test battlefield developments as they were observed, in order to provide campaign analysis and inform future decisions. Mr. Tim Barrick, director of wargaming at Marine Corps University, and Maj Ian Brown, operations officer at the Krulak Center, discuss the prototyping and designs processes applied to the Operational Wargame System and Fleet Marine Force/Littoral Commander wargame systems as the war in Ukraine unfolded.

#BruteCast S5 E5–Tim Barrick & Ian Brown, “Wargaming and the Russo-Ukraine War”
Showing off OWS and Littoral Commander…

New ArrivalFive Parsecs from Home – Third Edition: Solo Adventure Wargaming (Modiphius, 2021). Five Parsecs from Home is a set of rules for miniatures wargaming. Specifically, it is a set of solo “campaign” and combat rules. The feel is very Classic Traveller RPG-like. Look for a future #Wargame Wednesday feature.

Boardgames

Well, a card game actually. Picked up a replacement copy of Star Wars: Jabba’s Palace – A Love Letter Game (Z-Man Games, 2022). My original copy was a birthday present but I gave it up to RockyMountainNavy Jr. as he packed for college.

Social Media

I “appeared” on the Season 9 premier of “Mentioned in Dispatches”, the official podcast of The Armchair Dragoons. Our topic was supposed to be “I know what you did last summer” but we meandered through many topics. Final edited version coming in the next few weeks.

Armchair Dragoons Regimental Commander Brant was gracious enough to publish my article, “Thematic? A look at Flashpoint Series Volume 1 from GMT Games” (29 Aug 2022). The article in turn kicked off a wide-ranging (and reaching) Twitter discussion of “game” vs. “simulation.” Listen for more on that topic in the near-future!

I’m also giving a shout out to Rex Brynen at PAXSIMS who mentioned my Armchair Dragoons article “Wargame History – An anti-nuclear wargame in Fulda Gap”  in his recent “Simulation & gaming miscellany, 3 September 2022” posting. If you are a wargamer and not a follower of Rex and his PAXSIMS site you are doing yourself a great disservice.


Feature image “OWS tutorial with the Marine Corps War College Advanced Studies Program. Doing the Battle Royale naval domain scenario focused purely on teaching game mechanics.” Courtesy @BarrickTim on Twitter.

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#FamilyFriday – Collecting fishy ‘shrooms in Kingdomino Origins (@BlueOrangeGames, 2021) #Boardgame #GameNight

RockyMountainNavy T and myself had another Saturday Boardgame Night featuring Kingdomino Origins (Designer Bruno Cathala from Blue Orange Games, 2021). Whereas last week we used gameplay mode 1. Discovery Mode, this week we stepped it up to gameplay mode 2. Totem Mode. Once again, the genius design of Kingdomino Origins showed itself and contributed to another very thinky-but-enjoyable play.

In Totem Mode there are resources added to the game of Kingdomino Origins. Grasslands get Mammoths, Lakes have Fish, Jungles hide Mushrooms, and Quarries yield Flint. If a Volcano erupts and throws fire into a territory with a resource, that resource is destroyed. A very interesting game mechanism is that at the end of every turn, the player with the most of each resource gains the Totem for that item. The most Mammoths is worth 3 points, most Fish is 4 points, most Mushrooms 5 points, and most Flint is 6 points. This Totem can pass back and forth every round. At the end of the game, the player holding the Totem gains that many bonus points.

All-in-all the rules for resources in Kingdomino Origins are very simple, but once again that “simple” set of rules adds another layer of challenge into the game. Do I sacrifice a resource for that Fire? Do I try to have the most Flint? This “simple” extra layer is on top of the demand for a centered homeland in a 7×7 territory (normally 5×5 but 7×7 in a two-player game).

Compared to the last time we played Kingdomino Origins, at least this time I completed a perfect 7×7 territory. Last time that was the margin of my loss. This game I thought I was doing well with plenty of Fish and Mushrooms. When the final score was tallied, I was flabbergasted by RMN T’s score…43 points ahead of me! How did he get that many more resources?

Alas, while I had been concentrating on trying to maximize resources, RMN T never lost sight of the basic scoring mechanism in Kingdomino Origins. While I worked to collect the most Fish and Mushrooms, RMN T used very cleverly placed Fires and built a territory with two huge scoring lands at 55 and 49 points each. That focus on the basics, coupled with just enough resource competition, gave him that run away win.

Once again, Kingdomino Origins has shown that the game we are very familiar with can present a new and more challenging version without onerous additional rules. I have the feeling that Kingdomino Origins will become our two-player, go-to Kingdomino title to play. RMN T and myself already agreed that next week we will try gameplay mode 3. Tribe Mode that adds Cave People to play.


Feature image courtesy RMN

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#ThursdayReading – September used books a weekend early #militaryhistory #militaryscience

I try to schedule a run to the used book store only once a month. That means I should have waited until next weekend to go but life happens. Here are my September used book finds…for late August.

Miracle at Midway, Gordon Prange, New York: Penguin Books, 1982 (softcover). From the publisher:

Here is the definitive history of the battle of Midway, an American victory that marked the turning point of the war in the Pacific during World War II. Told with the same stylistic flair and attention to detail as the bestselling At Dawn We SleptMiracle at Midway brings together eyewitness accounts from the men who commanded and fought on both sides. The sweeping narrative takes readers into the thick of the action and shows exactly how American strategies and decisions led to the triumphant victory that paved the way for the defeat of Japan.

Goodreads

I am well aware that Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully’s Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway (Potomac Books, 2005) rewrote the story of the Battle of Midway, but before they came along it was Fushida through Prange that drove the common narrative of the battle. While Miracle at Midway is not the current viewpoint it is still very good to read and understand.

The Wizards of Armageddon, Fred Kaplan, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1983 (hardcover w/dustjacket). From the publisher:

This is the untold story of the small group of men who have devised the plans and shaped the policies on how to use the Bomb. The book (first published in 1983) explores the secret world of these strategists of the nuclear age and brings to light a chapter in American political and military history never before revealed.

Goodreads

Another book that is commonly referenced but which I lacked a personal copy of. I wonder where today’s “wizards” are with the threat of North Korean strategic and tactical nuclear weapons and the Extended Deterrence strategy.

7 Leadership Lessons of D-Day: Lessons from the Longest Day – June 6, 1944, John Antal, Havertown: Casemate Publishers, 2017 (hardcover w/dustjacket).

The odds were against the Allies on June 6, 1944. The task ahead of the paratroopers who jumped over Normandy and the soldiers who waded ashore onto the beaches, all under fire, was colossal. In such circumstances good leadership can be the defining factor in victory or defeat. This book is about the extraordinary leadership of seven men who led American soldiers on D-Day and the days that followed. Some of them, like Eisenhower, Theodore Roosevelt Jr, and Lieutenant Dick Winters, are well known while others are barely a footnote in the history books. 

Goodreads

Colonel Anatal is quickly becoming one of my favorite military leadership and strategy authors. He is very easy to read and always has great points.


Feature image by RMN

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#Wargame Wednesday – Anytime, Baby! Grognard memories of Tomcats

Some of you might of noticed a few weeks back that I listed this new article: “Persian Tomcats: Can Iran get another 20 years out of its F-14s? (How Iran manages to keep its F-14 Tomcats flying),” by Babak Tagvhee in Aviation News, August 2022.

Part of the reason I flagged this article is that Tomcats and my air combat wargaming have long gone hand in hand. The first modern air combat wargame I owned was the TSR edition of Air War: Modern Tactical Air Combat (1983). The cover featured, of course, an F-14 Tomcat.

Never paid attention to the other planes… (Photo by RMN)

Not an air combat game, but in 1986 I picked up Target: Libya, a magazine game in Strategy & Tactics No. 109 based pretty much on the Tomcat cover only.

Less than 3 years later I would be in almost the same place (Courtesy BGG)

The second modern air combat wargame I acquired was Air Superiority from GDW in 1987 featuring…a Tomcat on the cover!

Gulf of Sidra Incident…sorta (Photo by RMN)

Even my favorite naval combat wargame, Harpoon, got into the Tomcat “game” with the cover of Harpoon: Battles of the Third World War – Modern Naval Warfare Scenarios from GDW in 1987.

Note the Red Storm Rising reference… (Photo by RMN)

My love affair with Tomcats was not limited to just wargames. One of the earliest Squadron/Signal Publications books to enter my collection was F-14 Tomcat in Action: Squadron/Signal Publications Aircraft No. 32 by Lou Drendel (1977).

Mostly B&W photos but the color plates…(Photo by RMN)

Who can forget the incredible flying scene in the movie The Final Countdown (1980) where Tomcats and “Zeros” tangle!

“Play with them” YouTube

In 1986 the designer of Harpoon, Larry Bond, was credited as co-author with Tom Clancy for his bestselling novel Red Storm Rising. Although we don’t “see” any Tomcats in the book, we read all about them, especially in the chapter “Dance of the Vampires” which we now know was plotted with the assistance of Harpoon.

Tomcat targets (Courtesy ATG)

In 1986 we also get the original Top Gun movie and all that Tomcat love…

“Jesters’ Dead” YouTube

The cover of what may be the best-ever coffee table aviation photo book by C.J. Heatley III (what a great aviator name) is The Cutting Edge (Charlottesville: Thomasson, Grant & Howell, 1986) and has…Tomcats.

Seriously, I read it only for the pictures (Photo by RMN)

My Osprey Publishing book collection even has a Tomcat entry with Iranian F-14 Tomcat Units in Combat: Osprey Combat Aircraft 49 by Tom Cooper and Farzad Bishop (2004). There is LOTS of good wargame scenario fodder in this book!

Persian ‘Cats (Photo by RMN)

For this winter, I have a 1/144th scale plastic model from Trumpeter to build.

I also have a Soviet Backfire C for “target practice” (Photo by RMN)

Part of my love affair for Tomcats also comes from my two cruises with Dale ‘Snort’ Snodgrass. Although he was not my squadron skipper, he was a legend in the Naval Aviation community that we all respected. His death in 2021 was as sad as it was unexpected.

Dale Snodgrass practicing his “banana pass” off the deck of USS America in 1988. (Photo by ABE3 Sean Dunn, courtesy of Dale Snodgrass)

While the Tomcat-cover wargames are not the only air combat games in my collection, they are the most memorable. Now that I think about it, the cover of Birds of Prey: Air Combat in the Jet Age (Ad Astra, 2008) features an F-15 Eagle. Maybe that cover, as much as the difficult rules, explains why I don’t enjoy BoP?


Feature image by self

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#ThreatTuesday – Essential background sources for modern-era #NorthKorea #wargame design and play

If you want to play a wargame involving conflict on the Korean Peninsula, you can play titles like Mitchel Land’s Next War: Korea (GMT Games, 2019). It is also helpful if you have some background to better understand the situation and threat. Here are three titles that I consider essential reading for players (and aspiring designers) of modern conflict on the Korean Peninsula.

North Korea Military Power: A Growing Regional and Global Threat, Washington, DC: Defense Intelligence Agency, 2021. Press Announcement – “This volume in DIA’s series of military power reports provides details on North Korea’s defensive and military goals, strategy, plans and intentions. It examines the organization, structure and capability of the military supporting those goals, as well as the enabling infrastructure and industrial base.”

The Armed Forces of North Korea: On the Path of Songun, Stjin Mitzer & Joost Oliemans, Warwick: Helion & Company, 2020. From the Publisher – “North Korea’s Armed Forces maps the most important events from the inconclusive ceasefire struck at the end of the Korean War, throughout the Cold War until modern day. An especially heavy emphasis is placed on the current status of the Korean People’s Army by examining their wealth of indigenously designed weaponry. In the course of the book not only will many of the Korean People’s Army’s most secret projects and tactics will be covered, and its conflict history with the South and the world at large is put into new context. Moreover, an up-to-date, comprehensive assessment of the equipment holdings of several branches of the Korean People’s Army is included, offering a numerical estimate of its naval and aerial capabilities. From the recently introduced stealth missile boats, ballistic missile submarines and main battle tank families to their often-ignored indigenous aircraft industry, virtually all indigenous weapons systems are discussed extensively.”

Helion & Company, 2020

ATP 7-100.2 North Korean Tactics, Washington, DC: Department of the Army, July 2020. From the Introduction – “ATP 7-100.2 addresses the tactics, organization, and activities of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s ground forces. Part one of this document focuses on the strategic and operational levels, and includes North Korea’s military structure, organizational philosophy, and an introduction to functional tactics. Part two focuses on the tactical level, and describes Korean People’s Army Ground Forces (KPAGF) offensive and defensive tactics in detail. Several appendixes provide additional information on specific military functions and their use in tactical situations.”

Alas, there is no single-source tactics guide for the Korean People’s Air Force (KPAF)…

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sits in an airplane as he guides a flight drill for the inspection of airmen of the Korean People’s Army (KPA) Air and Anti-Air Force in this undated photo. (KCNA/Reuters)

…nor for the tactics of the Korean People’s Navy (KPN).

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, front, stands on the conning tower of a submarine during his inspection of the Korean People’s Army (KPA) Naval Unit 167 in this undated photo. (KCNA/Reuters)

A Note of Caution: While these sources certainly create a solid baseline of understanding, they are not “living documents” and therefore some of the data is possibly outdated or has been supplemented by newer understanding. But it’s a start…


Feature image – North Korean leader Kim Jong-un presides over an urgent operation meeting on the Korean People’s Army Strategic Rocket Force’s performance of duty for firepower strike at the Supreme Command in Pyongyang, March 29, 2013. The sign on the left reads, “Strategic force’s plan to hit the mainland of the U.S.” (KCNA/Reuters)

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#SundaySummary – #Wargame data and multi-domain, #Boardgame fun, #militarybooks art of command & historical analysis, and rockets with Tsiolkovsky

Wargames

This week saw several Harpoon 5 (Admiralty Trilogy Group) data annex purchases:

  • America’s Navy (Admiralty Trilogy Group, last updated Oct 2021). From the publisher – “America’s Navy lists all the US Navy warships in service between 1955 and the present day, as well as some US Coast Guard ships and other vessels. It is designed as a sourcebook for Harpoon, fifth edition, but it can also be used as a general reference. Organized as a collection of annexes, Annex A provides statistics on ships as built, and  any modifications and refits over time, sometimes many times. Annexes C and on give detailed weapons and sensors characteristics, including guns, missiles, ASW weapons, radars, sonars, with all the information needed to use them in a Harpoon scenario. A new feature of this edition is information on air groups used by aviation ships. Annex R, by Andy Doty, is the most complete list available anywhere, and provides data on units, aircraft types, and number of aircraft for each deployment.”
  • America’s Aircraft (Admiralty Trilogy Group, last updated Oct 2021). From the publisher – “America’s Aircraft lists the US Navy, US Coast Guard, and US Air Force aircraft in service between 1955 and the present day….In addition to real-world platforms, many canceled or proposed aircraft and their systems are also described.”
  • China’s Navy (Admiralty Trilogy Group, last updated Oct 2021). From the publisher – “China’s Navy lists the ships and aircraft used by the People’s Liberation Army Navy and Air Force and Chinese Coast Guard, in service between 1955 and the present day…The book also provides information on land-based surface-to-air missiles and coastal defense missiles and their battery organization. Supplemental annexes list ship classifications and factors used to convert weapons and sensor information into game data.”

If you are a fan of the Next War series by designer Mitchel Land from GMT Games, you definitely need to check out the Multi-Domain rules offered by Ian Sullivan on the Inside GMT Blog. His “Making ‘Next War’ More Multi-Domain: Some Alternative Rules for the ‘Next War’ Series” are easy-to-incorporate rules but go far to bring the game “up to date.”

Boardgames

The Saturday Game Night title was Kingdomino Origins (Blue Orange Games, 2021) using gameplay mode 2. Totem Mode. This gameplay mode adds resources as a bonus; you gain points for each resource in your territory at end game and also score additional points if you have the majority-share of each resource between players.

Stuart Tonge’s “strategic historical game,” 2 Minutes to Midnight (Plague Island Games, 2022) got a deep rules review this week. I last saw a prototype review copy just before the Kickstarter campaign started and am quite happy with the finished product. Not sure if this will get to the gaming table in a two-player or solo version first…

Role Playing Games

Can you believe it? I actually picked up some new tabletop RPG material!

  • Flight of the Phaeton- A Ship for Cepheus Engine (Thunderegg Productions, last updated July 2022). From the publisher – “Although most of its components are TL 9, this lowly ship houses a powerful heart of antimatter. Its TL 20 power plant is based on alien technology. This plant runs not only the revolutionary Alcubierre drive, but also a devastatingly powerful antimatter weapon. Can humanity, in the infancy of its space travel, handle the incredible responsibility of such power? As the captain, it’s up to you to find out!” This is my first Thunderegg Production product so something of an experiment.
  • Playing Solo: Classic Traveller (Zozer Games, last updated Apr 2022). From the publisher – “The aim is to create a roadmap for solo play; rolling dice, creating and recording with a purpose. With an added table or two, this can involve running a group of characters through some daring heist or fighting with alien pirates over a lost treasure long sought, and is an incredibly enjoyable, imagination-stimulating pastime. Of course whatever is created also provides a ready-made setting with adventure hooks for a group of Traveller players at the table top.”

Reading

Working my way through Mastering the Art of Command: Admiral Chester W. Nimitz and Victory in the Pacific by Trent Hone (Naval Institute Press, 2022). Taking my time to savor this one. Hone’s approach, focusing on Nimitz as the leader of a complex, adaptive system, is very interesting…

The new article of the week is, “What We Have Learned from Doing Historical Analysis” by Christopher Lawrence of the Dupuy Institute. Historical analysis is not operations research and it’s more than just history. Wargaming is actually intimately connected to historical analysis although many players don’t know (or maybe want to acknowledge) the fact. His article is the “Last Word” in the Summer 2022 edition of PHALANX, the quarterly journal of the Military Operations Research Society (MORS). See Lawrence, Christopher A., “What We Have Learned from Doing Historical Analysis,” PHALANX (Summer 2022), Vol. 55: No. 2, 50-52.

It’s Not Rocket Science…Until It Is

Finally, not sure if this fits reading, boardgames, or wargames. Ken Burnside of Ad Astra Games offers several books on how to make space combat games more realistic. His latest offering is Tabletop Tsiolkovsky (Ad Asdtra Games, last updated Aug 2022). Ken describes the book as:

While the very first space combat game (Triplanetary) had fuel on the rockets, most space combat systems don’t use fuel at all. With the popularity of television series like The Expanse and Babylon 5, audiences are more interested than ever a touch of realism in their space combat games.

The most effective way to add accuracy is to acknowledge the Tyranny of the Rocket Equation.

Konstantin Tsiolkovsky was one of several people to derive the equations of rockets in the early 20th Century, and his is the name most commonly associated with it. If you’ve ever heard the term “delta-V” (Δv), that’s “total change in velocity,” and it comes from his work.

This product provides a small amount of background on the Rocket Equation, and describes use cases. The bulk of the product are simple to use lookup tables: Cross reference the percentage of your ship’s mass devoted to fuel with the tech level of your engine, and you get the total number of fuel points in “thrust units per turn”, which map to whatever game scale your game uses.  There are three tables covering three different possible settings, and it will work with any game with a ship construction system.

Wargame Vault

Hah! I like how Triplanetary is hailed as a more “realistic” boardgame, and The Expanse and Babylon 5 franchises are singled out as more hard sci-fi. This is gong to make all the $tar War$ and $tar Trek(le$$) fans upset, eh?


Feature image courtesy USNI News – “Chinese frigate Weifang leaves the Black Sea on May 14, 2015. Photo by Yörük Işık

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#FamilyFriday – Fossilized in #Boardgame #GameNight by Neolithic #Kingdomino Origins fm @BlueOrangeGames (2021)

Kingdomino, designed by Bruno Cathala and published by Blue Orange Games in 2016 is a RockyMountainNavy family favorite. We use it as a gateway game to introduce others to hobby boardgaming. We have gifted it maybe a dozen times. Over the years we acquired several different versions; Queendomino (2017), Kingdomino, Age of Giants (Expansion, 2018), Dragomino (2020) and Kingdomino Origins (2021). So popular is the game that when RockyMountainNavy Jr. packed for college he took the family copy (not to worry, we have several extra on the gifting shelf).

With RMN Jr. off to college, RockyMountainNavy T and I now face off against each other on Saturday Game Nights. This last week we decided to bring out Kingdomino Origins and play a two-player game. We set up the game, and I took a quick glance at the rules for the first of the three gameplay modes in the box—Discovery Mode. There, in the very first lines of the rules, was something that I had totally missed before; “2 player game rules specifications can be found at the end of this booklet.”

Hey…I’ve got this!

Two player Kingdomino is very straightforward. Each player has two Kings and you remove 24 of the 48 tiles before play. When making a domino selection, you can choose any of the remaining tiles. Simple.

As I read, I discovered Kingdomino Origins uses, “Special two player rules – Neolithic.” There are two subtle rules changes that made a big difference in our play:

  • Use all 48 dominos to make a 7×7 territory (this is called the Mighty Duel variant in Kingdomino)
  • When choosing tiles at start, the Chief that goes first gets to choose tiles 1 and 3 OR tiles 2 and 4.

We rarely play Kingdomino with two-players (Kahuna by Gunter Cornett from Kosmos in 1998 being the usual 2-player go-to quick boardgame). The few times we played 2-player we usually don’t play the Mighty Duel variant. We also have never seen the alternate starting order as laid out in the Kingdomino Origins Neolithic gameplay mode. It was enough of a change to make this play far more challenging.

It has been years (and I mean years) since I have not completed a perfect 5×5 or 7×7 territory (called Homo Hablis in Kingdomino Origins or Harmony in Kingdomino). I picked wrong one round (!) and ended up with an unusable tile, thus missing my perfect 7×7. The five points missed was enough to give RMN T a 2-point win.

Disappointment hasn’t felt this good in a while.

We both haven’t played a brain-burner game of Kingdomino in years. The game is usually more a fun pastime than a serious thinking challenge. Not tonight. We both wracked our brains on a simple 7×7. It was glorious.

Welcome back, Game Night. You’re off to a great start!


Feature image by self

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#Wargame Wednesday – Admiralty Trilogy Group on Moska Sinking

Not long after the sinking of the Russian Federation Navy cruiser Moskva in the Black Sea, I posted my own analysis of the event using the Harpoon V rules from Admiralty Trilogy Group. Now, co-designer Chris Carlson walks though his analysis of the event in a recent Admiralty Trilogy Chat on YouTube. The presentation is the same one Chris presented at Historicon 2022 and is available online. That said, listening to Chris walk through it is well worth your time. The Moskva presentation starts at around the 10:30 mark:

Via Peter Robbins channel on YouTube

Feature image courtesy Twitter

RockyMountainNavy.com © 2007-2022 by Ian B is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

#ThreatTuesday – ROK Navy’s 1st 3000 tons KSS-III Submarine ‘Dosan Ahn Chang-ho’ Started Sea Trials — John’s Navy and other Maritime or Military News

ROK Navy KSS III submarine ‘Dosan Ahn Chang-ho’ starting its seat trials. Picture by: https://ift.tt/qF1r5Io ROK Navy’s 1st 3000 Tons KSS-III Submarine ‘Dosan Ahn Chang-Ho’ Started Sea Trials Xavier Vavasseur  23 Jun 2019 The DSME-built submarine ‘Dosan Ahn Chang-ho’ started its seat trials from Opko shipyard on June 10, 2019. It is the first vessel of […]

ROK Navy’s 1st 3000 tons KSS-III Submarine ‘Dosan Ahn Chang-ho’ Started Sea Trials — John’s Navy and other Maritime or Military News